Saturday, June 23, 2012

ONE MISSED CALL (2003)

A young woman receives a mysterious voicemail from herself two days in the future. Two days later (at the exact moment of the voicemail timestamp) she finds herself unexpectedly saying the same shit she said on the voicemail...right before getting tossed in front of a train by a ghost. So now one-by-one all of the people on her quick dial start getting phone calls and then dying in boring ways two days later. Yawn.

As you can probably tell by now I'm not really the biggest fan of ghost movies, mainly because I don't finds ghosts scary, but at the same time I kinda like ghost horror movies because of the variety of the stories and there's really no set rules. So with that in mind I was very excited to watch a ghost movie directed by the great Takashi Miike especially the Takashi Miike from 2003 because that's the same year me made GOZU which might be Miike's finest moment.. Well, I think he probably blew his creative wad on GOZU because ONE MISSED CALL is pretty lame. The ghost isn't scary and depends too much on jump scenes and the story is so confusing I pretty much tuned out after Kazue Fukiishi died. She, by far, was the most talented (not to mention captivating) actress in the movie so I'm not sure why she wasn't the main character.

Another thing that irritated me is after Kazue was violently mutilated and beheaded by the ghost on live television(!!!) followed by the ghost called the next girl (still on live television!!!) why was the main girl allowed to just walk off? Something like that would have been the biggest news story since the moon landing and yet this chick is allowed to wanted off and start exploring an old abandoned hospital by herself?! That's even more unrealistic than the idea of the ghost haunting a phone because you know there would be a hundred television crews following her day and night for the next 48 hours.

Not worth watch. Interesting idea, but the story is too confusing and the payoff nonexistent. Skip it.

Part 2
Part 3
Remake

Crew members hand visible.

The great Renji Ishibashi.